Commemorating Jefferson Davis’s Inauguration, 150 Years Later

Here’s an extended video covering the events in Montgomery, Alabama, yesterday, commemorating the 150th anniversary of the inauguration of Jefferson Davis as provisional president of the Confederacy.  I am a little disappointed, however … a video on Kevin Levin’s Civil War Memory included a Harry Potter reference.  Go to the ten second mark (most of the rest of this speech is captured on the first video, as are other addresses and a different perspective on those in attendance).

As one report put it,

[Kelly] Barrow also referenced fictional character Harry Potter in his speech, using him to address the struggle of good versus evil. He went on to mention Rosa Parks, stating while she moved from the back of the bus to the front, the “people of the Confederacy have been forced to the back of the bus.”

Someone needs to remind Mr. Barrow that there are no “people of the Confederacy” around.  The last ones would have been entitled to sit in the seats reserved for senior citizens.

If you’re wondering where you might have heard of Mr. Barrow before, here’s a hint: he’s fond of fiction.

I’m waiting for even more linkages between contemporary popular culture in America and the people and events of 150 years ago.  First there was Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter; now it’s Harry Potter and the War for Confederate Independence; perhaps next it will be “The Office” refashioned as Team of Rivals, or “Kim, Khloe, and Mary Lincoln Take New York,” a show about celebrities and shopping.  Branding and marketing prevail again.

As for your reaction to the videos, the comments section is open.

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3 thoughts on “Commemorating Jefferson Davis’s Inauguration, 150 Years Later

  1. I attended this event. I wonder if they realized how the war they love so much would have on the, say, 200 re-enactors in military uniform. Forty of them would die,. Of the remaining 160, sixty would be wounded. The survivors would endure penury in a land ravaged by war. How anyone can see glory in that situation is beyond me! The Civil War was the great American tragedy, not its epic.

  2. He went on to mention Rosa Parks, stating while she moved from the back of the bus to the front, the ‘people of the Confederacy have been forced to the back of the bus.’”

    So on the one hand, Mr. Barrow promulgates the historical lie that tens of thousands of African-Americans fought side-by-side with white soldiers for the confederacy, and yet on the other hand he admits in the above quote that African-Americans were not part of “the people of the Confederacy.”

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