8 thoughts on “The Rise of Ulysses S. Grant

  1. peterjprice2012 October 17, 2012 / 8:13 am

    If Only we had Leaders like
    ‘Grant and Lincoln’in the White
    House Today… Instead we have these Inept Human Beings Called
    ‘Politians’who are more Worried
    about Looking Good for the Camera than Leading Our Country
    !!

  2. peterjprice2012 October 17, 2012 / 8:15 am

    Oops! I mean ‘Politicians’, Not
    ‘Politians’…

  3. Noma October 17, 2012 / 8:18 am

    Is there a law that states that theatrical directors are prohibited from reading Horace Porter, or Albert Deane Richardson, or Hamlin Garland, or even Bruce Patton?

    Also, Grant didn’t say that Robert E. Lee was the best general the South had to offer. He said that Joseph E. Johnston was the best.

    Why is it that you never see anyone *remotely* like the Grant that they depict? Where is the humility? The graciousness? The solicitude? The kindness?

    Always the same, very unimaginative swash-buckling, cussing — and extremely arrogant — stereotypical general. That’s great for the Three Stooges, or even F Troop.

    But isn’t is almost time to get serious, and present the remarkable person that his early biographers describe?

    I’m looking forward to seeing what the Lincoln movie will be like — but I’m also dreading it. Will they trot out the same old, hackneyed, stereotypical general? And the next day, all my friends will say, “Hey, I saw Grant in that movie last night. Quite a character!” But probably it will really be, “Nope, you didn’t see Grant — you only saw a generic antithesis of Robert E. Lee — again!”

    But, maybe I will be wrong. If so, it will an amazing surprise.

  4. Al Mackey October 17, 2012 / 8:40 am

    I have to admit, North and South is a guilty pleasure. 🙂

    • Rob Baker October 18, 2012 / 8:46 am

      It really is for me as well. I can’t help it. I actually use small plugs of it to represent different sides and personalities of southern slave owners; as well as the difference between abolitionists and anti-slavery persons in the North for my classes.

  5. John Foskett October 17, 2012 / 10:29 am

    That’s actually not a bad table cloth. And after watching this, I retract my skepticism about Brands. It reminds me that you can never have too many fact-based Grant biographies floating around.

  6. michael confoy October 17, 2012 / 10:23 pm

    Well Meade wasn’t exactly fired. Put on a short leash? Micro managed?

  7. 1864bummer October 21, 2012 / 12:39 pm

    Grant learned from his experiences and failures, in and out of the military. Thus, when leading his forces during the Civil War, he applied his successes and mistakes to his leadership, earning the respect of his soldiers, friends and foes.

    During the Mexican War, Grant was assigned to Quartermaster under General Taylor and later General Scott. In the mountains on the way to Mexico City, wagons could not be used to transport the armies’ supplies, so Grant bought mules and hired locals to handle the beasts. These pack animals, at first, were a unmanageable and stubborn lot, wearing thin his patience and composure. The pack train was, however, successful and supplied the necessities of the army in their victory over Santa Ana.

    General Grant’s unimposing style of dress and demeanor were impressed upon him by his first commanding officer during the Mexican War. General Taylor led his troops in common garb, stayed among his men at the front lines, in order to know first hand, the current situation and often sat his horse with both legs on one side observing the action. Taylor was a favorite of the common soldier, because he interfaced directly with his force.

    Grant learned from his experiences and failures, in and out of the military. Thus, when leading his forces during the Civil War, he applied his successes and mistakes to his leadership, earning the respect of his soldiers, friends and foes.

    Bummer

    “I never learned to swear … I could never see the use of swearing … I have always noticed … that swearing helps to rouse a man’s anger.”

    “I am not aware of ever having used a profane expletive in life; but I would have the charity to excuse those who may have done so, if they were in charge of a train of Mexican pack mules.”

    Ulysses S. Grant

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