Flagger Fizzle Fallout

Coverage of last Saturday’s Flagger fizzle continues in the media.

Often people note that it’s terribly hard to find the flag. Others lash out at the entire enterprise. From Tennessee a writer managed to take some shots at the Old Dominion. Here someone raises questions about Confederate heritage. Up at Boston University an editorial raises other questions. So does a piece in an upstate New York paper.

This piece in the Washington Times describes how the Confederate flag and Confederate heritage has affected Virginia governors in the past as well as the chief candidates for that office this year.

Other than the flag’s awkwardly obscure location–one that makes it rather difficult to see, despite all the claims we hear about how there will be improvements to the site (I can think of a few)–is there anything unexpected in this commentary?

4 thoughts on “Flagger Fizzle Fallout

  1. Noma October 4, 2013 / 8:23 am

    “Don’t worry about what people think the Confederate flag symbolizes, we want it to mean something else” say the flaggers. Interesting. Putting aside the fact that I disagree with their fundamental premise (I agree with Alexander Stephens – slavery is the cornerstone on which the Confederacy was built) — you just have to wonder what would be the reaction to suddenly flying flags with swastikas all over the place? Would they then say, “Well, actually the swastika is the symbol for the goddess Sarasvati, and has been the symbol of good luck for several thousand years. It has nothing to do with hating Jews”? I don’t think so.

    • Charles Lovejoy October 4, 2013 / 12:59 pm

      Norma “Well, actually the swastika is the symbol for the goddess Sarasvati” very few people know that

  2. Flamethrower October 5, 2013 / 2:15 pm

    The Delaware Indians used a swastika too, only it was reversed mirror-wise.

  3. Michael Confoy October 5, 2013 / 7:33 pm

    “It’s for sentimental reasons.” Such sweet people.

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