Another Online Resource

If you like sketches like these …

… then you might like to look at this:

CHARLES WELLINGTON REED PAPERS

The papers of Civil War soldier and artist Charles Wellington Reed, who served with the Ninth Independent Battery, Massachusetts Light Artillery, includes approximately seven hundred sketches and correspondence relating primarily to the Civil War. The letters are often prefaced by drawings which further illustrate not only the rigors of military life, but also the amusing and mundane aspects. The contents of the letters and corresponding sketches well document the ways in which soldiers adapted to seasonal changes in the weather, how they amused themselves, and the routines of camp life in the Army of the Potomac.

Online presentation: http://www.loc.gov/collection/charles-reed/about-this-collection/

Finding aid in html: http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/eadmss.ms001005

Finding aid in pdf: http://rs5.loc.gov/service/mss/eadxmlmss/eadpdfmss/2001/ms001005.pdf

Reed won the Medal of Honor for his actions at Gettysburg in rescuing battery commander Captain John Bigelow on July 2, 1863, when the 9th Massachusetts Battery came under attack that afternoon.

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7 thoughts on “Another Online Resource

  1. Noma August 21, 2014 / 1:18 pm

    This looks like a wonderful resource. To me, even the cover drawing is exciting. You never see a photo of Grant and Lincoln together, and to see a drawing is almost as rare. Also, isn’t Reed the one who did the sketch of Grant whittling at the Battle of the Wilderness? Thanks!

      • Dave August 21, 2014 / 1:35 pm

        HI Brooks, Reed also illustrated the book, Hardtack and Coffee by John D Billings.

  2. Mark August 21, 2014 / 1:59 pm

    Sublime

  3. Buck Buchanan August 21, 2014 / 2:38 pm

    Sidenote: The 9th Mass Battery is a mandatory stop for me when I take tours to Gettysburg. A perfect example of how a disciplined unit can perform effectively during their first combat experience.

  4. hankc9174 August 23, 2014 / 7:42 pm

    The serenity in your photo is quite a counterpoint to the July day 151 years ago. It’s easy to forget the cannon’s purpose…

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